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What Are the Differences Between the Cold, Warm, and Hot Redundancy Connection Modes?


Last Update: 11/12/2018

Descriptions of the redundancy connection modes are as follows:

  • Cold: In this mode, the application will only connect to one underlying server at a time. A connection to the primary server will be made at startup and all client-related requests will be forwarded onto the primary. In the event that the connection to the primary server fails (or communications are lost), a connection will be made to the secondary server.
  • Warm: In this mode, the application will attempt to maintain a connection to both the primary and secondary server at all times. The application will initialize data callbacks for the primary server on startup. In the event that the connection to the primary server fails (or communications are lost), a data callback will be initialized for the secondary server.
  • Hot: In this mode, the application will attempt to maintain a connection to both the primary and secondary server at all times. The application will initialize data callbacks for both primary and secondary servers on startup so that both servers will send data change notifications. The data received from the primary will be forwarded onto the client. In the event that the connection to the primary server fails (or communications are lost), the data received for the secondary server will immediately be forwarded onto the client.

Note: For more information, refer to RedundancyMaster's Connection Mode.

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